What is Orthodontics (Braces & Invisalign)

Orthodontics

Types of Orthodontic Problems

Orthodontic misalignments, called malocclusions, can indicate a number of different conditions. Inherited malocclusions include jaw growth problems, congenitally missing teeth, extra teeth, crowded or protruded teeth and spacing problems. However, the premature loss of baby teeth, retention of baby teeth, thumb- or finger-sucking, accidents and certain types of dental disease can also result in a need for orthodontic treatment.

Importance of Orthodontic Treatment

Correcting orthodontic problems is not just about cosmetics and improving self-confidence; there are very important dental health reasons as well. Malocclusions can cause difficulty in chewing and speaking, according to the AAO, while wearing away enamel on healthy teeth and putting excess stress on your gum tissue and surrounding bone. In addition, teeth that are crooked or overlapping are difficult to clean, which can put you at risk for tooth decay and gum disease.

Orthodontics
Invisalign

Invisalign

Invisalign, also known as invisible braces, is made of smooth plastic aligners that are virtually invisible, removable and fit comfortably over the teeth. Each aligner is specially customized and will gradually shift your teeth over time.

Pros:

Promotes best oral hygiene as it allows you to continue brushing and flossing your teeth normally

Almost invisible and allow you to undergo treatment discreetly

Comfortable as there is no irritation to the gums or surrounding tissues

Removable and has minimal interferences on your daily activities and diet

Cons:

Costly

Clear Braces

Clear braces consist of ceramic or polycarbonate (plastic) brackets stuck onto the front of teeth, clear rubber bands and a Teflon coated or fiberglass archwire. They can be either conventional or self-ligating.

Pros:

Less noticeable than metal braces

Cons:

More expensive than metal braces

The ligature can stain easily without proper care

Clear Braces
Conventional Dental Braces

Conventional Dental Braces

Metal braces (1st generation) is the most common and popular form of treatment and consist of metal brackets stuck onto the front of teeth, rubber bands and an archwire.

Pros:

Cheap

Choice of modules (colored rubber bands) available

Cons:

Most noticeable type of braces

Less hygienic as it is difficult to clean in-between brackets

Sharp ends of brackets often cause mouth ulcers

Longer treatment time

Lingual Braces

Lingual braces are very similar to conventional and self-ligating braces except that they are placed behind the teeth and less noticeable

Pros:

Less noticeable and not visible from outside

Cons:

Difficult to clean

More expensive

May cause slight difficulties in speaking

May hurt the tongue and be uncomfortable at first

Regular adjustments take a long time and are more difficult as compared to traditional braces

Lingual Braces
Self Ligating Braces

Self Ligating Braces

Self-ligating braces (2nd generation) use a ‘sliding door’ technique in which metal brackets are stuck onto the front of teeth, allowing the archwire to slide back and forth without the need for rubber bands to hold it in place.

Pros:

More hygienic than metal braces as less food gets trapped between brackets

Requires fewer adjustments and visits to the dentists compared to conventional braces

Shorter treatment time than 1st generation metal braces

No staining problems

Cons:

More expensive than 1st generation metal braces

Technique sensitive

Dental Surgeons